David A. Katz et al ”Gender Diversity on Boards: The Future Is Almost Here”

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‘A board composed of directors representing a range of perspectives leads to an environment of collaborative tension that is the essence of good governance. In a room where everyone has different points of view and there is a greater opportunity for cross-pollination of ideas, there are fewer unspoken assumptions, less “group think” and a greater likelihood of innovation. This allows the board to ask the probing questions and tackle the challenging issues, such as risk management and succession planning, which are at the center of good corporate governance.

”Exxon Mobil must allow climate change vote: SEC”

”Morningstar Introduces Industry’s First Sustainability Rating for 20,000 Funds Globally, Giving Investors New Way to Evaluate Investments Based on Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) Factors”

”CHICAGO, March 1, 2016—To help investors evaluate funds based on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors, Morningstar, Inc. (NASDAQ: MORN), a leading provider of independent investment research, today introduced the Morningstar Sustainability RatingTM for funds. The new rating will enable investors around the world to evaluate mutual funds and exchange-traded funds based on how well the companies held in their funds are managing their ESG risks and opportunities.

”Is Japan ready for social innovation?”

Is Japan ready for social innovation?
Professor Kanji Tanimoto

”TOKYO —In recent years, “social entrepreneurship,” “social innovation” and “sustainability” have found their way into the mainstream conference last September at Waseda University under the theme “Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Innovation.”

How companies succeed through radical engagement | McKinsey & Company

“The authors of Connect: How Companies Succeed by Engaging Radically with Society explain why organizations must look beyond corporate-social-responsibility initiatives to truly engage with consumers and communities.

Antibusiness sentiment is nothing new. Yet mending the rift between big business and society isn’t merely a worthy goal—it may represent a new frontier of competitive advantage, profitability, and longevity for today’s organizations. In Connect: How companies succeed by engaging radically with society (PublicAffairs, March 2016), L1 Energy chairman and former BP chief executive officer John Browne, McKinsey’s Robin Nuttall, and entrepreneur Tommy Stadlen offer a practical blueprint for reconciling companies and communities.

The Economist Intelligence Unit: “Cost of inaction – Recognising the value at risk from climate change”

The value at risk to manageable assets from climate change calculated in this report is US$4.2trn, in present value terms. The tail risks are more extreme; 6°C of warming could lead to a present value loss worth US$13.8trn, using private-sector discount rates. From the public-sector perspective, 6°C of warming represents present value losses worth US$43trn—30% of the entire stock of the world’s manageable assets.